Maine Wedding Venue Map

map for wedding

For those of you wondering what the French’s Point property looks like, check out this new map we’ve developed of the grounds. You can see the ocean borders the property on three sides, which makes for stunning panoramic views of the bay. We have a spot along the water on the east side for tables and kayaks, two tree swings overlooking the grounds, and a new patio on the north side for cocktail hour and other gatherings.

Hersey Retreat Road ends at French’s Point, which means the traffic here is limited to those entering or leaving the property. The property is consequently very serene and secluded.

You can see from this map that Beach Rose Farm and the Estate both have nice, expansive lawns and just enough distance between the two buildings for some distinction in case guests want to mellow out at one location and go wild at another. The main gazebo, on the Estate property, is our most popular site for the wedding ceremony as it sits right along the south shore along Penobscot Bay. The white pathway from the Estate often functions as the central aisle during the bridal procession.

Finally, to the northwest, notice how close Sandy Point State Beach is to the property. Sandy Point is a 100-acre nature preserve with opportunities for swimming, picnicking, and sunbathing. It’s a great retreat for anyone looking for a brief escape.

This aerial view details how French’s Point is charming and private but also versatile enough to offer plenty to do for guests of all ages. We believe we’re blessed at French’s Point to have such beautiful grounds and historic buildings to bring wedding dreams to life.

Also check out some other maps we have produced:

Getting to French’s Point
French’s Point: A Home Base for Coastal Excursions
Read more.. Thursday, September 13th, 2012

Getting to French’s Point

Traveling to French’s Point is as simple as choosing whether you’d like to arrive by plane, train or automobile. Situated on a secluded harbor where the Penobscot River flows into the Atlantic Ocean, French’s Point offers both privacy and accessibility.

How to get here:

By car — We’re located a 8.5-hour drive from New York, 5 hours from Boston, 2.5 hours from Portland and 35 minutes from Bangor. From the south, just hop on Interstate 95, which becomes the Maine Turnpike, until you reach Portland, then pick up 295 for a short stint and exit in Brunswick to Route 1, a scenic coastal byway that will take you through Rockland and Camden and on to our home of Stockton Springs. From the north, take 95 to Route 1A for a charming drive along the river. Bypass this leisurely route and Google Map your driving directions here.

By air — Major airlines serve the region through Boston’s Logan International Airport, Portland International Jetport and, for the shortest post-flight drive, Bangor International Airport. Limited daily flights are also available to the Knox County Airport in Rockland, 40 miles south. You’ll find limousine service at the Portland and Bangor airports, and car rentals are available at all three. The Belfast Municipal Airport, just 15 minutes away, provides nationwide and Canadian charters as well as helicopter service.

By train — If you’re traveling through Boston, pick up the Amtrak Downeaster, a passenger train that will carry you north to Portland. Rent a car or hop on a bus, which stop in nearby Searsport, for the remainder of the trip. For a leisurely excursion after you and your guests arrive, check out Maine Eastern Railroad’s coastal trips between Rockland and Bath aboard restored vintage railcars.

Read more.. Sunday, July 15th, 2012

French’s Point: A Home Base for Coastal Excursions

Maine_wedding_image

You might have heard the old Maine expression, “You can’t get there from here.” Or, pronounced with a proper Down East accent, “You cahn’t get theyah from heeah.” Fortunately, the saying’s more humorous than it is accurate – you can get to plenty of places from French’s Point.

We’re situated at a handy midway point between Midcoast Maine’s most famous hotpots. To the south, Rockland beckons with fantastic waterfront events including the Maine Lobster Festival and the North Atlantic Blues Festival, as well as dozens of specialty stores and the nationally recognized Farnsworth Art Museum.

Just up the road, Rockland’s sister town of Camden earns its nickname as the “Jewel of the Maine Coast” with one-of-a-kind boutiques and sweeping views from atop Mount Battie in the surrounding hills. Together, the two locales draw thousands of visitors each year.

To the east of us is the Maine coast’s other renowned tourist destination: Bar Harbor. A seaside town of rocky cliffs and bustling shops, Bar Harbor inspires Maine’s postcard image, serving as a gateway to the wilds of Acadia National Park.

Make French’s Point your home base for exploring both Rockland-Camden and Bar Harbor, and don’t miss the less publicized gems in between. Stroll the historic red brick downtown of Belfast and take in an art exhibit, or view pristine historic homes on the elm-lined streets of Castine. Slightly inland, the village of Blue Hill, which takes its name from the blueberry-covered mountain rising above it, draws hikers, kayakers, sailors and other outdoor enthusiasts.
For a bird’s eye view of all these sights, take an invigorating one-minute elevator ride to the top of the Penobscot Narrows Bridge & Observatory. From 420 feet up, you’ll come to appreciate the region in a whole new way.

See for yourself why so many refer to the Midcoast as “the real Maine.”

Wedding in Maine

Read more.. Sunday, November 27th, 2011

French’s Point: A Home Base for Coastal Excursions

Maine_wedding_image

You might have heard the old Maine expression, “You can’t get there from here.” Or, pronounced with a proper Down East accent, “You cahn’t get theyah from heeah.” Fortunately, the saying’s more humorous than it is accurate – you can get to plenty of places from French’s Point.

We’re situated at a handy midway point between Midcoast Maine’s most famous hotpots. To the south, Rockland beckons with fantastic waterfront events including the Maine Lobster Festival and the North Atlantic Blues Festival, as well as dozens of specialty stores and the nationally recognized Farnsworth Art Museum.

Just up the road, Rockland’s sister town of Camden earns its nickname as the “Jewel of the Maine Coast” with one-of-a-kind boutiques and sweeping views from atop Mount Battie in the surrounding hills. Together, the two locales draw thousands of visitors each year.

To the east of us is the Maine coast’s other renowned tourist destination: Bar Harbor. A seaside town of rocky cliffs and bustling shops, Bar Harbor inspires Maine’s postcard image, serving as a gateway to the wilds of Acadia National Park.

Make French’s Point your home base for exploring both Rockland-Camden and Bar Harbor, and don’t miss the less publicized gems in between. Stroll the historic red brick downtown of Belfast and take in an art exhibit, or view pristine historic homes on the elm-lined streets of Castine. Slightly inland, the village of Blue Hill, which takes its name from the blueberry-covered mountain rising above it, draws hikers, kayakers, sailors and other outdoor enthusiasts.
For a bird’s eye view of all these sights, take an invigorating one-minute elevator ride to the top of the Penobscot Narrows Bridge & Observatory. From 420 feet up, you’ll come to appreciate the region in a whole new way.

See for yourself why so many refer to the Midcoast as “the real Maine.”

Wedding in Maine

Read more.. Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011